Appreciating Mary

Just read a very convicting blog post on Internet Monk.  Here’s the passage that hit hardest:

Evangelicals tend to ignore or downplay Jesus’ mother, in reaction to what they perceive as overemphasis or even heretical devotion to her by the Roman church and other traditions. However, the Gospel of Luke gives her great honor, portraying her as the true and ultimate matriarch of our faith. Mary joins and surpasses Sarah, Rebekah, Rachel and Leah, Ruth, and Hannah, and is presented as the mother through whom God brought his redemption promises to pass.

It is true.  I frequently discount Mary so as not to feel or sound too Catholic (not that I hold anything against the Catholic church as a whole, I just don’t believe in all their doctrines).  But Mary was perhaps the greatest faith example of a woman in the Bible.  I suppose it is wrong to “rank” people in the Bible.  They aren’t basketball players.  But like the founding fathers of our Nation, there are some that just stand out naturally.  I always think of David as being a “man after God’s own heart.”  I don’t always think of Mary as the matriarch of our faith, but I should.

I can’t speak for women, but I wonder if some of them consider Mary to be too high of a standard to live up to.  Aside from Jesus, I find a similar feeling in relation to Paul.  But Paul at least complains about having a thorn in his flesh and being the chief of sinners.  (We all know David had periods of detestable sin in his life)  But Mary seems pretty near perfect, so you can see how the Catholic faith would revere her.

Still, I think the author of the post puts it best when he says:

Many times throughout her life, the powers of the world overshadowed, pressured, and threatened this woman. yet in her song she expresses what people of faith in all generations have learned—God is not with those who wield earthly power. His heart is with those who look to him in simple faith and entrust their destiny to him.

The example of Mary isn’t of perfection necessarily.  You don’t see any cases of her doing anything wrong in the Bible, but I don’t think she’s presented as perfect either.  I believe the example of Mary is that of faithfulness and focusing on God, following his will without question.  Which is an example we all can learn from, man or woman.

Advertisements

3 thoughts on “Appreciating Mary

  1. You should have a problem with the RCC if you are truly a Christian.

    The god of Roman Catholic doctrine is not the God of the Bible; therefore, that leaves only one alternative, the “god of this age” (2 Cor. 4:4). Thus, the vast majority of those in the Roman Catholic Church are lost. However, those in Roman Catholic churches who have trusted in the Lord Jesus Christ alone and do not embrace the teachings of the Roman Catholic Church in their heart may be saved.
    -John Napier

    At the moment the Roman Catholic Church condemned the biblical doctrine of justification by faith alone, she denied the gospel and ceased to be a legitimate church, regardless of all the rest of her affirmations of Christian orthodoxy. To embrace her as an authentic church while she continues to repudiate the biblical doctrine of salvation is a fatal attribution.
    -R.C. Sproul

  2. wow Matthew,

    That’s an incredibly offensive statement, questioning my faith based on a comment about a church that I have no affiliation with.

    But that aside, I’ll say that I believe in salvation by faith alone, which I gather is what you believe as well. I am pretty sure that someone in the RCC can be saved as easily as the thief on the cross. Which is the beauty of the Gospel.

    The only point I was trying to make with my statement is that I cannot pass judgement on the church or its members. Something you seem willing to do.

  3. Do Catholics believe in the triune God? Yes. The orthodox beliefs about the Holy Trinity were worked out in the early ecumenical councils and are affirmed by Roman Catholics and by most Protestant churches, including me a former Roman Catholic. Jeff, you are right.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s